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Before/After TST

POOR SITTING WITH HELP - BETTER SITTING WITH HELP (FRONT)

Before TST The breathing muscles have dual roles as postural muscles, since they are weak the children have no core strength to help them sit. To compensate they still use the strong superficial muscles which babies with immature breathing use for support.  On a bigger child these muscles operate as a whole body jumpsuit which can suddenly stiffen causing the child’s whole body to arch or become limp and incapable of support. This means that when a parent trys to sit a child, the child may suddenly stiffen or become floppy either of which makes assisted sitting impossible.

After TST the diaphragm becomes stronger, so the child’s breathing also assists with posture producing increased core strength. Better breathing also creates a more flexible spine and a longer stronger neck. The power of the over dominant superficial muscles is reduced permitting the children to be more co-ordinated and comfortable when placed in the sitting position and to take an increasing interest in their surroundings.

Poor Sitting with Help (Front)

Poor Sitting with Help (Front)

Poor Sitting with Help (Front)

Poor Sitting with Help (Front)

Poor Sitting with Help (Front)

POOR SITTING WITH HELP  -  BETTER SITTING WITH HELP (BACK)

Before TST the children find it difficult even to sit aided because their breathing is so weak there is little diahphragm pressure available for central support. Without this core stability there is not the structural foundation necessary to assist co-ordinated movement. This means the development of organised movement is virtually impossible.

After TST the diaphragm movement is strengthened, improving lung expansion and creating stronger breathing pressures which gradually strengthen core body tissues. The result is improved posture, limb co-ordination and head control helping the children to develop a greater interest in their daily life.

Poor Sitting with Help (Back)

Poor Sitting with Help (Back)

Poor Sitting with Help (Back)

Poor Sitting with Help (Back)

Poor Sitting with Help (Back)

Poor Sitting with Help (Back)

NOT SITTING INDEPENDENTLY - SITTING INDEPENDENTLY (FRONT)

Before TST the weak diaphragm and consequent poor posture prevents independent sitting and contributes to poor head and limb control.

After TST better breathing creates improved blood circulation and posture, producing better head and limb and hand control. The children are consequently more confident and better able to explore their environment.

Not Sitting

Not Sitting

Not Sitting

Not Sitting

Not Sitting

Not Sitting

Not Sitting Independently

NOT SITTING INDEPENDENTLY - SITTING INDEPENDENTLY (BACK)

Before TST the child’s weak diaphragm gives only weak postural support, so that independent sitting is impossible. Body growth adapts to weaker internal pressures caused by restricted breathing movements. These weak pressures cause the neck to be weak and underdeveloped, the head to be unstable, the arms to be less free so cannot assist with balance.

After TST the children all have stronger diaphragms giving them a better sitting base. Stronger breathing improves the internal pressures created by breathing, increasing blood circulation to the nerves and connective tissues between the joints, opening up the spine and neck and creating better limb and head control.

Not Sitting Independently

Not Sitting Independently

Not Sitting Independently

Not Sitting Independently

Not Sitting Independently

POOR SITTING INDEPENDENTLY - BETTER SITTING INDEPENDENTLY (FRONT)

Before TST the relatively weak diaphragm cannot produce the breathing pressures and postural support necessary to strengthen the abdomen and stabilise the spine. The abdomen is therefore weak and the internal organs are compressed. The weak shoulders and neck cause the head to be pulled forward by over dominant superficial muscles.

After TST the internal pressures created by every breath taken are now stronger and the diaphragm is working well as both a breathing and a postural muscle The spine appears opened up and straightened, the abdomen is stronger and the abdominal organs no longer so compressed. The children sit well taking the weight on their thighs with their shoulders and necks much better aligned. Overall the children can be seen to have gained improved control over their bodies.

Poor Sitting Independently (Front)

Poor Sitting Independently (Front)

Poor Sitting Independently (Front)

Poor Sitting Independently (Front)

Poor Sitting Independently (Front)

Poor Sitting Independently (Front)

POOR SITTING INDEPENDENTLY - BETTER SITTING INDEPENDENTLY (BACK)

Before TST the diaphragm is relatively weak causing the children to have curved spines and poor postural control at the waist. Instead of sitting firmly on their buttocks and thighs sitting body weight is taken by the pelvis. which tilts to one side. The children’s shoulders are pulled forward and appear to slope because of over tight superficial muscles which are now being used to compensate for the weak core. These superficial muscles also pull the children’s weak necks forward.

After TST the diaphragm’s increasing strength creates better breathing pressures which both open up the vertebrae and strengthen the spine and create a much better sitting posture with more diaphragm strength now at the waist. Sitting weight is taken correctly by the buttocks and thighs. In addition increased respiratory expansion has created straighter better aligned shoulders giving each child a stronger straighter neck.

Poor Sitting Independently (Back)

Poor Sitting Independently (Back)

Poor Sitting Independently (Back)

Poor Sitting Independently (Back)

Poor Sitting Independently (Back)

[Picture:Before After TST25]

Normal Posture

Information to be added ...

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